LYNX
(April schedule and May schedule)

     Lynx constellation is visible throughout the year, only part of it is behind the northern horizon in the evenings in August, September and October. It is in best position for evening observing in March, when it is high on the sky over our heads at the zenith and also in February and April when it is very close to the zenith.
     In November it is rising on the northeastern sky, in December in the evening it is low on the northeastern sky, in January it is higher on the northeastern sky, in February it is very high on the northeastern sky, in March it is in best position for evening observing when it is over our heads at the zenith, in April it is very high on the northwestern sky close to the zenith, in May it is on the northwestern sky, in June and July it is low on the northwestern sky, in August, September and October partly is set behind the northern horizon.
     We will observe it in April when is very high on the northwestern sky close to the zenith and in May when it is still relatively high on the northwestern sky.

Double and multiple stars

     12 Lyncis - Its total visual magnitude is 4.9. Its distance from the Earth is about 200 light years. It consists of three components with visual magnitudes 5.4, 6.0 and 7.1. The first two stars are very close apparently on the sky at a distance of about 1.7 arc seconds and probably they are true gravitationaly connected and orbit around the common center of their mass with period of several hundred years. The third component is about 9 arc seconds away from the pair and probably is real companion gravitationaly connected with the pair and orbiting them.

     38 Lyncis - Its total visual magnitude is 3.8. Its distance from the Earth is about 120 light years. It consists of two components with individual visual magnitudes 3.9 and 6.6. Both components are main sequence stars with main component about twice the mass and twice the diameter of our Sun and hotter than our Sun. 

Deep sky objects
(will be observed only from dark location outside of the city)

     NGC 2419 - It is globular cluster of stars in the constellation Lynx. Its visual magnitude is 9.0. Its distance is about 300,000 light years from the Earth. Its diameter is about 500 light years and about 12.5 billion years old, comparable with the age of the universe. This globular cluster is probably the biggest and the brightest of all which orbit our galaxy. There are about 150 globular clusters which orbit around our galaxy. They are situated in the galactic halo.