LYRA
(June schedule, July schedule, August schedule, September schedule, October schedule)

     Lyra constellation is summer constellation and it is in best position on the sky for evening observing in July when it is high on the southeastern sky very close to the zenith, in August when it is exactly over our heads at the zenith and in September when it is high on the western sky very close to the zenith.
     During the evenings in May it is rising on the northeastern sky, in June it is climbing on the eastern sky, in July it is high on the southeastern sky very close to the zenith, in August it is exactly over our heads at the zenith, in September it is high on the western sky very close to the zenith, in October it is high on the western sky, in November it is on the northwestern sky, in December it is low on the northwestern sky and during the evenings in January it sets behind the northwestern horizon.
     We will observe it during the evenings in June, in July, August and September when it is in best position for evening observing, and in October. Can be observed in November too.

Double and multiple stars

     Epsilon Lyrae - Astronomers call this star Double Double. That is because both components of this double star system are in fact again double stars when observed with bigger magnification through telescope. The combined visual magnitude of this star system on the sky is 3.9.  It is about 160 light years away from the Earth.
     The first and second component of this star system Epsilon1 and Epsilon2 are separated on the sky by 208 arc seconds (3.5 arc seconds), enough to be seen even with naked eye as two very close stars on the sky with similar visual magnitudes. They are true binary star system with orbital period of probably several hundred thousand years because of their large separation in space. When observed with more powerful telescope, both stars are in fact again close doubles. Epsilon1 consists of two close components with visual magnitudes 5.0 and 6.1 and separated on the sky by 2.6 arc seconds. Epsilon2 also consists of two close components with visual magnitudes 5.2 and 5.5 and separated on the sky by 2.3 arc seconds. Components of Epsilon1 are also true binary star system with orbital period of about 1,000 years. The same applies for the components of Epsilon2. When we look at the components of Epsilon1 or Epsilon2 through a telescope, try to place two or three solar systems between the stars to imagine their real separation in space. On the other hand, the separation between Epsilon1 and Epsilon2 is probably about 150 solar systems.
     Epsilon Lyrae is one of the most beautiful multiple star in the sky, what we see as one star with naked eye, in fact are four similar in brightness stars. They are of the same spectral class,  with masses and temperatures a bit bigger than our Sun.

     Zeta Lyrae - The combined visual magnitude of this star when seen as one star on the sky is 4.1. The first component has visual magnitude on the sky 4.3 and it is about 160 light years away from the Earth. The second component has visual magnitude on the sky 5.6 and it is also about 160 light years away from the Earth. Their separation on the sky is about 44 arc seconds. Because of the large separation, the orbital period of this binary is maybe hundred thousand years. Both stars are larger, heavier and hotter than our Sun. The brighter component is spectroscopic binary, with orbital period of several days.

     Beta Lyrae - Its name is Sheliak. It is binary star system about 900 light years away from the Earth.
     The first component is in fact eclipsing binary star system with visual magnitude on the sky which varies from 3.3 to 4.3 with 13 days orbital period. They can not be resolved with optical telescope but only with spectrometer. There is mass transfer between these two stars. In the past, now the smaller and dimmer star was bigger and brighter and evolved and expanded into a giant star. Because the companion is close to the giant, most of the mass from the giant was transferred to the companion, and now the companion is more massive and brighter. 
     The second component of Beta Lyrae is separated from the first component on the sky by about 46 arc seconds. Its visual magnitude on the sky is 6.7. It is also spectroscopic binary star system with period of about 4 days.
     The first and second component of Beta Lyrae are much more massive and larger than our Sun, and much hotter.
     There is another component separated on the sky about 67 arc seconds from the first component with visual magnitude 9.9.
     Another component is separated 86 arc seconds from the first component and is with visual magnitude also 9.9.

     Alpha Lyrae - Its name is Vega. It is the brightest star in the constellation Lyra, and one of the brightest stars on the sky with visual magnitude 0.0. It is only 26 light years away from the Earth, makes it one of the most studied stars by professional astronomers. It is still main sequence star with mass and diameter about twice that of our Sun, and surface temperature about 9,500 K. Half billion years old. Stars twice more massive than our Sun will spend 1 billion years on the main sequence, before start expanding and become giants and finish as white dwarfs. It rotates rapidly, which makes it to have shape like egg. As a result, the star poles are closer to the core and hotter than the equatorial parts of the star. 
     One companion is about 78 arc seconds away from Vega on the sky and has visual magnitude 9.5.
     Another companion is about 118 arc seconds away from Vega on the sky and has visual magnitude also 9.5.

     Delta Lyrae - It is only optical double star. The components are separated about 630 arc seconds on the sky.
     Delta1 is spectroscopic binary star with orbital period about 90 days. Its visual magnitude on the sky is 5.6 and is about 1,000 light years away from the Earth. Its main component is massive and hot main sequence star. The companion has visual magnitude 10 and is orange giant.
     Delta2 has visual magnitude on the sky 4.5 and is about 800 light years away from the Earth. It is bright giant, that means a star which expanded to enormous proportions and cooled. Its diameter is about 300 times bigger than the diameter of our Sun, and its surface temperature about 3,500 K, which gives red-orange color to this star. Its mass is about 7 times bigger than the mass of our Sun. This star is at evolution stage of its life called asymptotic giant branch star. That can happen to stars which have initial mass between 0.6 and 10 masses of our Sun. 

Deep sky objects
(will be observed only from dark location outside of the city)